Month: October 2018

Infographic: Sell More Books Using the 6 Principles of Influence

via Infographic: Sell More Books Using the 6 Principles of Influence

https://icecube.asia/influence-in-online-marketing/

Icecube-Digital-Sales-Infographic-F

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So, you’ve Moved your Books to KDP Print. Now What?

Nicholas C. Rossis

CreateSpace-Amazon logos | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksLast month, I shared here the details of moving my books from CreateSpace to KDP Print in 3 easy steps. I also promised to see if there’s anything else you need to do next. Amazon has done all it can to ensure an easy move but it turns out that yes, there are still some issues and possible glitches that require your personal attention in order to ensure that the move goes as smoothly as possible.

Here is a checklist of things to check for after moving your files:

  • Create Space had fewer keywords than KDP. You can now add more keywords to your paperback.
  • KDP Print offers two categories — one more than CreateSpace. Put this extra book category to good effect!
  • Check the rights for your books. Specifically, if you are the sole editor of your book, check All territories – worldwide rights for it, as this will…

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This Halloween, Escape to Greece with an Evil Witch

Nicholas C. Rossis

The Raven Witch of Corfu | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book

This month, Amazon bestselling author Effrosyni Moschoudi is releasing her new novel in four compelling kindle episodes. If you’re looking for a cracking good read to enjoy this Halloween, this is a great choice!

Lizzie waited twenty years for her return to Corfu…

The Raven Witch of Corfu | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's bookLizzie is not your average tourist. She may have just arrived on the idyllic Greek island of Corfu, but her mind is not on having a good time. Far from it, Lizzie has a daunting task to undertake: to claim back her twin brother who was kidnapped twenty years earlier on her previous visit. In a cave. By an evil witch.

When Lizzie sees her brother again, she receives the shock of her life. The witch has tricked her… And, as if this weren’t enough, a handsome local steals her heart to complicate her life even further…

“It’s a step up from Mills and Boon – much…

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KDP Keywords Revisited

Nicholas C. Rossis

Readers of my blog will no doubt be aware of the importance of the categories and keywords your book uses. From using Amazon categories to increase your rankings to the perils of using keywords like Free, Bestseller, and Kindle, they can be used to optimize your book page. But, as I often say, book marketing is like building on quicksand: everything changes every other month.

No, it’s not that keywords are suddenly any less important — in fact, quite the contrary. It’s just that the way Amazon uses them to identify which books to display when a reader searches for a book to read seems to have changed lately.

Amazon Keywords, The Old Way…

As David Kudler of The Book Designer explains, it used to be that you could use natural-sounding phrases of two to five words for your keywords, especially those which returned between two hundred and a…

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Monster-Spotting in Medieval Maps, Part II

Nicholas C. Rossis

The Psalter Map | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books The Psalter World Map, c. 1260 Photo: Atlas Obscura / Public Domain/Wikipedia Commons)

East is placed at the top. The sun and moon hold lush forests. Jerusalem is the center of the world. And dragons hold the globe up at the bottom. But there is one aspect of the Psalter World Map, created in the 1260s, that is even stranger: a line-up of grotesque men located near Africa, two of whom have faces in their chests.

Blemmyae

These monsters, called blemmyae, were actually based on the writings of Classical authors such as Pliny the Elder. In The Natural History, penned in 77 AD, Pliny wrote of the members of a North African tribe who were “said to have no heads, their mouths and eyes being seated in their breasts.”

Over 1500 years later, authors were still talking about these chest-faced men. In Othello, none other than Shakespeare wrote…

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