Month: July 2016

5 Great Online Resources for Writers: Guest Post by Isa Cox

Nicholas C. Rossis

Image courtesy of Fredrik Rubensson under CC BY-SA 2.0 Image courtesy of Fredrik Rubensson under CC BY-SA 2.0

When it comes to making it as a writer, there are no hard and fast rules, it seems. For writers who have spent the better part of their lives receiving rejection letters, there’s always the J.K. Rowling story. For the die-hard traditionalists who say you need a publisher, you can always throw E.L. James at them. All in all, what the writing world has taught us in terms of popularity is that anything goes.

So to build up on the kind of characteristics that make writers stand out from the pack, check out these great resources for pursuing the writer dream. From indie publishing tips to great seminars on storytelling, there’s a plethora of information to bring your next novel straight to the New York Times Bestseller list—or on the shortlist for a Pulitzer, whatever floats your boat.

  1. The Paris Review

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Blog Tour Asante’s Gullah Journey -Friday

SAGBlogTour2016July

Blog Tour for Asante’s Gullah Journey

by S. A. Gibson

Today’s stop:

 

SAGBlogTour2016July

Blog Tour for Asante’s Gullah Journey

by S. A. Gibson

Today’s stop:

Blog Tour – Day Two – Asante’s Gullah Journey

SAGBlogTour2016July

Blog Tour for Asante’s Gullah Journey

by S. A. Gibson

Today’s stop:

It Ain’t Just Talk: 3 Crucial Elements of Great Dialog

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 8.14.11 AM

She’s baaaaack. Well, sort of. Today I have an extra special treat. This is going to sound super conceited but whatever, it is MY blog 😛 . But first lemme caveat with this.

I feel I DO have a knack for predicting the next big thing. Case in point, in 1993 I was at an air show and there was an unknown all-female band I chatted with because no one was really over there. I loved their unique sound and gushed over how one member employed the banjo (an instrument forgotten at that time).

I told them I was sure they were going to be the next biggest thing in country music, and even bought some of the cheap merchandise they sold to support their music and prove I meant what I said.

That little band was The Dixie Chicks.

I’ve done this time and time again with authors and…

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Blog Tour – Day One – Asante’s Gullah Journey

SAGBlogTour2016July

Blog Tour for Asante’s Gullah Journey

by S. A. Gibson

Today’s stop:

SAGBlogTour2016July

Explore the Blog Tour for

Asante’s Gullah Journey

by S. A. Gibson

Starting Monday, July 18, 2016

featuring book snippets, interviews, a puzzle, and ebook giveaways

TOUR SCHEDULE

 

July 18, 2016 MondayMy Writer’s JourneyInterview

July 19, 2016 TuesdaySL PERRINEBlog Visit

July 20, 2016 WednesdayJolie Byrne, StorytellerInterview

July 21, 2016 ThursdayThrough the writers lens blogBook Promotion Snippet

July 22, 2016 FridaySkye WritingInterview & Snippet

July 23, 2016 SaturdayThe Book News JournalSpotlight & Interview

July 24, 2016 SundayPaws 4 PuzzlesPuzzle Reveal &Snippet

July 25, 2016 MondayMetallicwolffInterview

July 29, 2016 FridayTiger HebertInterview

If I’ve Said It Once…

L. Davidson

Recently I had a message from a slightly disgruntled reader who has previously asked me for writing advice a few times. They were very polite, and we had a good discussion afterwards, but they felt that I often skirted around giving direct advice on writing and publishing when I’m asked for it.

The truth is, I do. It’s very deliberate on my part that when I’m asked for writing advice, I frame my answer very loosely so that it’s open to interpretation.

Who am I to tell you how to write? I can advise, sure. I’m happy to! I can tell you what works for me, or how you could come at a problem. I can repeat the “established” rules to you. Does that make my advice correct? Does that make it sound and foolproof? No, of course not.

Write every day? Well, in principle this is great, but in practice?…

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How Author Helen DeWitt Uses Language to Address the Problems In Her Life

In New York magazine, Christian Lorentzen has an interview with Helen DeWitt, author of The Last Samurai and Lightning Rods. Owing to a combination of misfortunes, misunderstandings and publishing-related snags, the critically acclaimed novelist has been perennially broke. But, despite a history of brushes with suicide, she has a secret weapon against letting life’s problems get her down…

Source: How Author Helen DeWitt Uses Language to Address the Problems In Her Life